According to Wiki, “Tutankhamun was slight of build, and was roughly 180 cm (5 ft 11 in) tall.[19] He had large front incisors and the overbite characteristic of the Thutmosid royal line to which he belonged. Between September 2007 and October 2009, various mummies were subjected to detailed anthropological, radiological, and genetic studies as part of the King Tutankhamun Family Project. The research also showed that Tutankhamun had “a slightly cleft palate[20] and possibly a mild case of scoliosis, a medical condition in which the spine is curved from side to side.

Examination of King Tut’s body has revealed previously unknown deformations in the king’s left foot, caused by necrosis of bone tissue.The painful affliction forced King Tut to walk with the use of a cane, many of which were found in his tomb, however it would not have been a life-threatening affliction.[21]

And we’ll see soon, a club foot is also in the mix.  Soo, it’s quite a stretch to make Tut out to be a warrior as the miniseries does. 

Ideal vs Real Tut beneath mask.

Ideal vs Real Tut beneath mask.

How does the mini-series end?

Although there is some speculation that Tutankhamun was assassinated, the consensus is that his death was accidental.[citation needed] A CT scan taken in 2005 showed that he had suffered a left leg fracture[30] shortly before his death, and that the leg had become infected. DNA analysis conducted in 2010 showed the presence of malaria in his system, leading to the belief thatmalaria and Köhler disease II combined led to his death.[31] On 14 September 2012, ABC News presented a further theory about Tutankhamun’s death, developed by lecturer and surgeon Dr. Hutan Ashrafian, who believed that temporal lobe epilepsy caused a fatal fall which also broke Tutankhamun’s leg.[32]

In June 2010, German said they believed there was evidence that he had died of sickle cell disease. Other experts, however, rejected the hypothesis of homozygous sickle cell disease[33] based on survival beyond the age of 5 and the location of the osteonecrosis which is characteristic of Freiberg-Kohler syndrome rather than sickle-cell disease.[citation needed] Research conducted in 2005 by archaeologists, radiologists, and geneticists, who performed CT scans on the mummy found that he was not killed by a blow to the head, as previously thought.[34] New CT images discovered congenital flaws, which are more common among the children of incest. Siblings are more likely to pass on twin copies of harmful genes, which is why children of incest more commonly manifest genetic defects.[22] It is suspected he also had a partially cleft palate, another congenital defect.[35]

Various other diseases, invoked as possible explanations to his early demise, included Marfan syndrome, Wilson-Turner X-linked mental retardation syndrome, Fröhlich syndrome (adiposogenital dystrophy), Klinefelter syndrome, androgen insensitivity syndrome, aromatase excess syndrome in conjunction with sagittal craniosynostosis syndrome, Antley–Bixler syndrome or one of its variants,[36] and temporal lobe epilepsy.[32]

A research team, consisting of Egyptian scientists Yehia Gad and Somaia Ismail from the National Research Centre in Cairo, conducted further CT scans […and ] have rejected the hypothesis of gynecomastia and craniosynostoses (e.g., Antley-Bixler syndrome) or Marfan syndrome, but an accumulation of malformations in Tutankhamun’s family was evident [including club foot]…

In late 2013, Egyptologist Dr. Chris Naunton and scientists from the Cranfield Institute performed a “virtual autopsy” of Tutankhamun, revealing a pattern of injuries down one side of his body. Car-crash investigators then created computer simulations of chariot accidents. Naunton concluded that Tutankhamun was killed in a chariot crash: a chariot smashed into him while he was on his knees, shattering his ribs and pelvis.

Naunton also referenced Howard Carter’s records of the body having been burnt. Working with anthropologist Dr. Robert Connolly and forensic archaeologist Dr. Matthew Ponting, Naunton produced evidence that Tutankhamun’s body was burnt while sealed inside his coffin. Embalming oils combined with oxygen and linen had caused a chemical reaction, creating temperatures of more than 200 °C. Naunton said, “The charring and possibility that a botched mummification led to the body spontaneously combusting shortly after burial was entirely unexpected.”[41][42]

A further investigation, in 2014, revealed that it was unlikely he had been killed in a chariot accident. Scans found that all but one of his bone fractures, including those to his skull, had been inflicted after his death. The scans also showed that he had a partiallyclubbed foot and would have been unable to stand unaided, thus making it unlikely he ever rode in a chariot; this was supported by the presence of many walking sticks among the contents of his tomb. Instead, it is believed that genetic defects arising from his parents being siblings, complications from a broken leg and his suffering from malaria, together caused his death.[43][44]