Facial Discrimination* and ‘Weight Bias’ gone wild.

 
 

Comments

  1. HeldenKline says:

    It was in the contract. That’s an image-based operation.

    • I wonder what percent of businesses are image-based? Certainly the “branding” phenom–think Nike, YSL, etc–of the last couple of decades has contributed. Might be more n more image-based businesses going forward since commentators say the US is becoming a more visual society.

      • HeldenKline says:

        I have no idea, Karl–but I think most business are not. However, there’s a sorting process that takes place before models get jobs in media, because there’s a particular demographic the advertiser wants to attract. For example, TV insurance ads aimed at older people show slim, active, healthy couples, not those with obvious illnesses or disability. But as I recall, Abercrombie and Fitch got in trouble not stocking size 12-14 for teen girls. In case you don’t know, these sizes have inflated over the years. You & I are probably about the same age, and I remember that the size 12 used to be about the size that 8 is now (in America).
        The US seems to be getting more tolerant of high weight individuals. It’s an unhappy situation, since plump children turn into obese adults with high rates of diabetes. It’s an unhappy situation, because you don’t want kids to feel bad about themselves, but you don’t want them to get into unhealthy ranges either.

  2. HeldenKline says:

    Regarding Fiorina, that’s her “old face” (or rather normal face) in the picture you posted. Fiorina has had so many fillers and so much surgery she is now barely recognizable…I always thought she had a handsome, lively appearance as a CEO. Not a great beauty, but perfectly appropriate for a business woman. Now her own relatives wouldn’t recognize her. Why is facial immobility so popular??? I just don’t understand that…

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